Sweeping hard floor surfaces is a common household job. If you’re like many people, you might be surprised at how many crumbs, grime, pet hair, and other debris you collect each time you sweep, even if you clean the floors on a regular basis. However, regardless of how regularly you clean, one critical question demands your attention. Are your floors being cleaned as thoroughly as they should be?

Your broom does all of the dirty work of sweeping the waste into a nice pile for you, but how clean is your broom? Maybe you didn’t aware you needed to clean your broom on a regular basis, or maybe you haven’t been as diligent as you should have been. In truth, you would not clean other sections of your home with a dirty sponge, towel, or other cleaning products, and you should not clean your home’s hard floors with a dirty broom. What does it take to thoroughly clean your broom?

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Cleaning Your Broom Head

Shake the Dust Off

Step outdoors to shake off the dust after each sweeping session or before the next one. Make sure you’ve positioned a good distance away from your door. After all, you don’t want dirt in a position where it may simply be tracked back inside. Simply tap the broom head on a tree trunk or other hard surface to clean. Repeat this procedure until there is no debris dropping off the bristles. If hair or other debris becomes noticeably tangled in the bristles, you may need to remove it by hand. A wide-toothed comb is another option.

Soak Your Broom

Your broom requires a thorough cleaning every few weeks. This procedure begins when you shake the dust off the broom head like you do every time you use it. Then you must make your cleaning solution. Choose a bucket that is large enough to hold the head of your broom. Fill the bucket halfway with hot water and your preferred cleaning solution. Liquid dish detergent and laundry detergent are common cleaning products. You may also add a little bleach to the mixture. Completely immerse the broom’s head in the soapy solution. Position the broom in the bucket so that it may soak for at least 30 minutes.

Wash the Handle

While the broom head is soaking, it’s time to pamper the handle. With frequent usage, the handle might get completely dirty. After all, how frequently do you clean your hands before sweeping? You can use a disinfectant wipe or a disinfectant cleaning solution sprayed on a clean cloth. Then, from top to bottom, wipe off the handle.

Rinse, Dry and Store Your Broom

Rinse the broom head with clean water after soaking it in soapy water for a fair amount of time. Rinse it until the water flows clear off of it. The bristles should then be towel-dried with a clean cloth. Because the bristles are likely still moist, you should take precautions to avoid mildew growth. Choose a well-lit place to store the broom until the bristles are totally dry to keep it in good condition. Always keep the broom’s head high when storing it.

Use a Separate Broom in Different Areas

Do you use the same broom for everything? Purchase different brooms for indoor and outdoor use. It makes sense to have distinct rooms for different zones of your house if you have a large property. You could, for example, use one broom for the kitchen and another for the restrooms. This technique might assist you in avoiding the inadvertent transfer of dirt from one location to another.

Your broom is only one of the items that have to be cleaned on a regular basis. When was the last time you cleaned the bristles of your vacuum or mop? Do you always dust your furniture with the same tool or rag? Our maids understand what it takes to provide a genuinely clean environment in which you can unwind. We always carry our own supplies, and we always keep our equipment clean and well-maintained. We are pleased to assist you with a one-time cleaning service or with an ongoing requirement for maid service. Contact our cleaning business today to learn more about our services and to schedule your first appointment with our expert cleaners.

Cleaning The Broom Head FAQ’s

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